Staff

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GREGG TULLY – Executive Director

Gregg Tully is the Executive Director of the Pan African Sanctuary Alliance, the largest association of wildlife centers in Africa, which includes 23 organizations in 13 countries which are securing a future for Africa’s primates and their habitat. Gregg is building the infrastructure needed to support PASA’s expansion in the long term while collaborating with wildlife centers to rescue and protect apes and monkeys and raise awareness about wildlife conservation.

Gregg earned a Ph.D. in animal behavior from the University of California Santa Barbara in 2006. He then turned his attention to the nonprofit sector, working as the Development Director of the Nepal Youth Foundation and in the Marketing and Communications department at the Marin Humane Society in California.

Tully moved to Nepal in 2011 and worked as the Development and Communications Manager of the Kathmandu Animal Treatment Centre, where he raised revenue by nearly 1/3 in one year in addition to acting as the Executive Director for six months. After receiving the Marin Humane Society’s Humanitarian of the Year award for his commitment to animal protection worldwide, he moved to Thailand in 2012 to join Soi Dog Foundation, the largest stray animal protection organization in Southeast Asia. As the CEO, Gregg Tully lead Soi Dog through a phase of rapid growth in which revenue increased by nearly 250% in two years while the number of staff more than doubled and the organization’s programs expanded from Thailand to Vietnam.

GREGG TULLY – Executive Director

Gregg Tully is the Executive Director of the Pan African Sanctuary Alliance, the largest association of wildlife centers in Africa, which includes 23 organizations in 13 countries which are securing a future for Africa’s primates and their habitat. Gregg is building the infrastructure needed to support PASA’s expansion in the long term while collaborating with wildlife centers to rescue and protect apes and monkeys and raise awareness about wildlife conservation.

Gregg earned a Ph.D. in animal behavior from the University of California Santa Barbara in 2006. He then turned his attention to the nonprofit sector, working as the Development Director of the Nepal Youth Foundation and in the Marketing and Communications department at the Marin Humane Society in California.

Tully moved to Nepal in 2011 and worked as the Development and Communications Manager of the Kathmandu Animal Treatment Centre, where he raised revenue by nearly 1/3 in one year in addition to acting as the Executive Director for six months. After receiving the Marin Humane Society’s Humanitarian of the Year award for his commitment to animal protection worldwide, he moved to Thailand in 2012 to join Soi Dog Foundation, the largest stray animal protection organization in Southeast Asia. As the CEO, Gregg Tully lead Soi Dog through a phase of rapid growth in which revenue increased by nearly 250% in two years while the number of staff more than doubled and the organization’s programs expanded from Thailand to Vietnam.

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KAITLYN BOCK – Communication & Administration Manager

Kaitlyn Bock is the Communications and Administration Manager for the Pan African Sanctuary Alliance. She holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Environmental Studies from New College of Florida and has a diverse professional background in primate conservation, communications and volunteer management.

For over 12 years, Kaitlyn has dedicated her career to serving threatened wildlife. In addition to conducting independent projects, she worked as a research assistant in the Peruvian Amazon, Sarteneja, Belize and Yellowstone National Park. Her passion for primate conservation started with internships at the Center for Great Apes and Cleveland Amory Black Beauty Ranch. After working in animal husbandry, Kaitlyn moved to Indonesia to serve in a communications capacity for Orangutan Foundation International and Sun Bear Outreach, where she used her expertise in content creation to build bridges between field conservation projects and a global audience.

Kaitlyn created and edited video and digital content for over 14 countries in her capacity as an editor for the tourism arm of the U.S. government. All the while, she continued her conservation work, joining PASA as a volunteer in 2015. She now lives in Portland where she feels honored to work on behalf of PASA’s diverse member sanctuaries as a full-time staff member.

KAITLYN BOCK – Communication & Administration Manager

Kaitlyn Bock is the Communications and Administration Manager for the Pan African Sanctuary Alliance. She holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Environmental Studies from New College of Florida and has a diverse professional background in primate conservation, communications and volunteer management.

For over 12 years, Kaitlyn has dedicated her career to serving threatened wildlife. In addition to conducting independent projects, she worked as a research assistant in the Peruvian Amazon, Sarteneja, Belize and Yellowstone National Park. Her passion for primate conservation started with internships at the Center for Great Apes and Cleveland Amory Black Beauty Ranch. After working in animal husbandry, Kaitlyn moved to Indonesia to serve in a communications capacity for Orangutan Foundation International and Sun Bear Outreach, where she used her expertise in content creation to build bridges between field conservation projects and a global audience.

Kaitlyn created and edited video and digital content for over 14 countries in her capacity as an editor for the tourism arm of the U.S. government. All the while, she continued her conservation work, joining PASA as a volunteer in 2015. She now lives in Portland where she feels honored to work on behalf of PASA’s diverse member sanctuaries as a full-time staff member.

Board of Directors

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SUSAN LUTTER – Chair, Board of Directors

Susan Lutter, chair of the PASA Board, comes to conservation after twenty-five years of general management and business development experience in start-up and high growth organizations in the US and Europe which have been followed by more than a decade of deepening and expanding experience in non-profit operations.

Early fascination with Koko, the sign-language speaking gorilla, led to Susan’s second career beginning with the Gorilla Foundation where she ultimately served as the organization’s Executive Director. With a broader visibility into the great ape community, it was the sanctuaries that captured her attention. As Director of Act for Great Apes, she advocates for increased visibility of and support for in-site conservation projects in range states, especially sanctuaries, and develops partnerships for primate welfare as well as for community education, sanitation and development.

Susan is a graduate of Thunderbird Graduate School of International Management and of DePauw University. She is also a Rotarian and serves on her club’s World Services Committee, selecting and administering humanitarian grants around the world.

SUSAN LUTTER – Chair, Board of Directors

Susan Lutter, chair of the PASA Board, comes to conservation after twenty-five years of general management and business development experience in start-up and high growth organizations in the US and Europe which have been followed by more than a decade of deepening and expanding experience in non-profit operations.

Early fascination with Koko, the sign-language speaking gorilla, led to Susan’s second career beginning with the Gorilla Foundation where she ultimately served as the organization’s Executive Director. With a broader visibility into the great ape community, it was the sanctuaries that captured her attention. As Director of Act for Great Apes, she advocates for increased visibility of and support for in-site conservation projects in range states, especially sanctuaries, and develops partnerships for primate welfare as well as for community education, sanitation and development.

Susan is a graduate of Thunderbird Graduate School of International Management and of DePauw University. She is also a Rotarian and serves on her club’s World Services Committee, selecting and administering humanitarian grants around the world.

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MARY ROSE – Secretary, Board of Directors

Mary Rose, Secretary of the PASA Board, began her “second” career in wildlife conservation after retiring early from university administration. Initially, she wanted to work on behalf of wolves and bears, but then she met the bonobos and gorillas at the Columbus Zoo. She found her passion – the apes! She is a member of the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium Board of Trustees, serves as vice-chair of the Conservation and Collection Management Committee, and chaired the Conservation Policy Committee. She also chairs the Zoo’s docent conservation committee. Mary established the Sulatalu Fund for Great Apes and supported the 2000 meeting of ape sanctuaries that led to the formation of PASA. About that same time she co-founded the Zoo’s conservation lecture series, “First Hand from the Field.” In addition, she is a founding member of Friends of Bonobos.

She worked in MBA program management at both Case Western Reserve University and The Ohio State University. Mary developed and implemented cultivation and marketing plans leading to increased number of corporate recruiters and co-founded the National MBA Consortium at Chicago and founded the National MBA Placement Directors’ Group.

Mary got her MBA from the University of Michigan. She did her undergraduate work at Mills College in Oakland, California.

MARY ROSE – Secretary, Board of Directors

mary_rose_thumbMary Rose, Secretary of the PASA Board, began her “second” career in wildlife conservation after retiring early from university administration. Initially, she wanted to work on behalf of wolves and bears, but then she met the bonobos and gorillas at the Columbus Zoo. She found her passion – the apes! She is a member of the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium Board of Trustees, serves as vice-chair of the Conservation and Collection Management Committee, and chaired the Conservation Policy Committee. She also chairs the Zoo’s docent conservation committee. Mary established the Sulatalu Fund for Great Apes and supported the 2000 meeting of ape sanctuaries that led to the formation of PASA. About that same time she co-founded the Zoo’s conservation lecture series, “First Hand from the Field.” In addition, she is a founding member of Friends of Bonobos.

She worked in MBA program management at both Case Western Reserve University and The Ohio State University. Mary developed and implemented cultivation and marketing plans leading to increased number of corporate recruiters and co-founded the National MBA Consortium at Chicago and founded the National MBA Placement Directors’ Group.

Mary got her MBA from the University of Michigan. She did her undergraduate work at Mills College in Oakland, California.Norman Rosen, Vice-Chair of the PASA Board, was a California State University Fullerton-Part time faculty member for 16 years, and serves as the Chair of the Orangutan Conservancy. He is one of the founders of PASA, and is President of Southern California Primate Research Forum and the Great Ape Program Coordinator for the Conservation Breeding Specialist Group.

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FRANCK CHANTEREAU – Treasurer, Board of Directors

Franck Chantereau, Treasurer of the PASA Board, and his wife Roxane founded J.A.C.K. (Jeunes Animaux Confiques au Katanga / Young Animals Confiscated in Katanga) in 2006, a nonprofit sanctuary in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The couple continues to manage J.A.C.K., which cares for orphan chimpanzee babies who have been confiscated by law authorities and works to stop the illegal wildlife trade.

Franck holds one of the two seats on the PASA Board of Directors for sanctuary managers, who are elected to the Board by the managers of all the sanctuaries rather than by other members of the Board.

FRANCK CHANTEREAU – Treasurer, Board of Directors

franck_chantereau_thumbFranck Chantereau, Treasurer of the PASA Board, and his wife Roxane founded J.A.C.K. (Jeunes Animaux Confiques au Katanga / Young Animals Confiscated in Katanga) in 2006, a nonprofit sanctuary in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The couple continues to manage J.A.C.K., which cares for orphan chimpanzee babies who have been confiscated by law authorities and works to stop the illegal wildlife trade.

Franck holds one of the two seats on the PASA Board of Directors for sanctuary managers, who are elected to the Board by the managers of all the sanctuaries rather than by other members of the Board.

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PAM CUNNEYWORTH – Member, Board of Directors

Pamela Cunneyworth, a Director on the PASA Board, is a Director of Colobus Conservation in Diani, Kenya overseeing the primate research and conservation activities of the organization. She received her Undergraduate Degree in Archaeology and Biology from Simon Fraser University, and her Master’s Degree in Anthropology with a specialization in Primatology from the University of Calgary. Since 1992, Pam has lived in East Africa working with chimpanzees in Burundi, researching baboons in Tanzania, carrying out base line surveys for forest conservation in the Usambara Mountains of Tanzania before beginning work at the international level, especially the Convention on Biological Diversity. She began working with Colobus Conservation in 2003 as Conservation Manager until 2006, returning on the Board of Directors in 2009.

PAM CUNNEYWORTH – Member, Board of Directors

pam_cunneyworth_thumbPamela Cunneyworth, a Director on the PASA Board, is a Director of Colobus Conservation in Diani, Kenya overseeing the primate research and conservation activities of the organization. She received her Undergraduate Degree in Archaeology and Biology from Simon Fraser University, and her Master’s Degree in Anthropology with a specialization in Primatology from the University of Calgary. Since 1992, Pam has lived in East Africa working with chimpanzees in Burundi, researching baboons in Tanzania, carrying out base line surveys for forest conservation in the Usambara Mountains of Tanzania before beginning work at the international level, especially the Convention on Biological Diversity. She began working with Colobus Conservation in 2003 as Conservation Manager until 2006, returning on the Board of Directors in 2009.

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LYNNE GAFFIKIN – Member, Board of Directors

Lynne Gaffikin’s interest in primate conservation dates back to the 1970s when she first traveled and studied in East Africa. She obtained her bachelor’s degree in physical anthropology and subsequently a doctorate in community health and epidemiology, providing a means of addressing community development issues in Africa, especially in remote rural areas hosting primate species. For the past 30+ years, she has worked in this capacity throughout the continent including through academic affiliations with Tulane, Johns Hopkins and, currently, Stanford universities.

In the late 1990s, as the interdisciplinary field of conservation medicine was gaining strength, Lynne welcomed the opportunity offered by the Mountain Gorilla Veterinary Project (MGVP) to incorporate preventative human health interventions as part of their expanding mountain gorilla conservation strategy. She still serves as one of their advisors. Around the same time, to more formally incorporate conservation into her work, Lynne founded Evaluation and Research Technologies for Health (EARTH), Inc. Its aim was to facilitate understanding and coordinated action among health, conservation and development players. Since then, she has worked with various organizations in the context of Conservation Medicine, One Health, Ecohealth, and general efforts linking conservation and development. This includes a two-year fellowship (2004-2006) in Madagascar in eco-regions hosting many of the nation’s lemur species. Lynne has been able to actively support her commitment to primate conservation over the years through her bridge-building work across domains.

LYNNE GAFFIKIN – Member, Board of Directors

lynne_gaffikin_thumb_2Lynne Gaffikin’s interest in primate conservation dates back to the 1970s when she first traveled and studied in East Africa. She obtained her bachelor’s degree in physical anthropology and subsequently a doctorate in community health and epidemiology, providing a means of addressing community development issues in Africa, especially in remote rural areas hosting primate species. For the past 30+ years, she has worked in this capacity throughout the continent including through academic affiliations with Tulane, Johns Hopkins and, currently, Stanford universities.

In the late 1990s, as the interdisciplinary field of conservation medicine was gaining strength, Lynne welcomed the opportunity offered by the Mountain Gorilla Veterinary Project (MGVP) to incorporate preventative human health interventions as part of their expanding mountain gorilla conservation strategy. She still serves as one of their advisors. Around the same time, to more formally incorporate conservation into her work, Lynne founded Evaluation and Research Technologies for Health (EARTH), Inc. Its aim was to facilitate understanding and coordinated action among health, conservation and development players. Since then, she has worked with various organizations in the context of Conservation Medicine, One Health, Ecohealth, and general efforts linking conservation and development. This includes a two-year fellowship (2004-2006) in Madagascar in eco-regions hosting many of the nation’s lemur species. Lynne has been able to actively support her commitment to primate conservation over the years through her bridge-building work across domains.

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REBECCA ROSE – Member, Board of Directors

Rebecca Rose, a Director on the PASA Board, is a 30-year veteran of the fields of wildlife conservation and education. As the field conservation manager for the Columbus Zoo, she oversaw the Zoo’s conservation grants program which awards more than $1 million annually to projects based in 30 countries.

In addition to the PASA board, Becky serves on the board of Friends of Bonobos – a U.S.-based support organization for the world’s only sanctuary for endangered bonobos in the Democratic Republic of Congo. She serves on the Board of the D.C.-based Center for Conservation Peace-Building, and is an advisor to the Ohio Wildlife Center.  Becky is a founder of the Zoos and Aquariums Committing to Conservation conference (ZACC) and a member of the steering committee for this biennial meeting which brings together zoo professionals and field conservationists to strengthen zoo support for wildlife conservation around the globe.

Rebecca began working with wildlife rescue organizations in the late 1980s when she met the founders of ARCAS – a group of dedicated Guatemalans who were determined to address the illegal wildlife trade in their country by building a rescue center to rehabilitate confiscated wild animals. Knowing the important connection between wildlife law enforcement and high quality rescue centers, Rebecca is dedicated to supporting the efforts of sanctuaries around the globe to stop the cruel and destructive illegal trade in wild animals.

REBECCA ROSE – Member, Board of Directors

becky_rose_thumbRebecca Rose, a Director on the PASA Board, is a 30-year veteran of the fields of wildlife conservation and education. As the field conservation manager for the Columbus Zoo, she oversaw the Zoo’s conservation grants program which awards more than $1 million annually to projects based in 30 countries.

In addition to the PASA board, Becky serves on the board of Friends of Bonobos – a U.S.-based support organization for the world’s only sanctuary for endangered bonobos in the Democratic Republic of Congo. She serves on the Board of the D.C.-based Center for Conservation Peace-Building, and is an advisor to the Ohio Wildlife Center.  Becky is a founder of the Zoos and Aquariums Committing to Conservation conference (ZACC) and a member of the steering committee for this biennial meeting which brings together zoo professionals and field conservationists to strengthen zoo support for wildlife conservation around the globe.

Rebecca began working with wildlife rescue organizations in the late 1980s when she met the founders of ARCAS – a group of dedicated Guatemalans who were determined to address the illegal wildlife trade in their country by building a rescue center to rehabilitate confiscated wild animals. Knowing the important connection between wildlife law enforcement and high quality rescue centers, Rebecca is dedicated to supporting the efforts of sanctuaries around the globe to stop the cruel and destructive illegal trade in wild animals.

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MICHELE STUMPE – Member, Board of Directors

Michele Stumpe, a Director on the PASA Board, is an attorney and partner in the Atlanta law firm of Taylor English Duma LLP. She began working with gorillas, chimpanzees and orangutans in the 1980’s as a zoo volunteer in the nursery at the Gladys Porter Zoo. Early in her legal career, Stumpe set out to combine her professional talents with her passion for conservation and great apes. Since 1999, she has volunteered at various sanctuaries in Africa and the US. She has also served on advisory boards to the Dewar Wildlife Trust, the only gorilla sanctuary in the USA, and the Great Ape Project, International. In 2005, Stumpe became a member of the Dewar Wildlife Trust Board of Directors.

As an entrepreneur who has created and run several successful companies, Stumpe is highly regarded in the legal and professional community for her integrity, insight and business sense. It was these qualities that led to her appointment in 2005 as the acting President of Great Ape Project, International – the umbrella organization for the Great Ape Project organizations throughout the world. In 2009, Stumpe and her husband started their own non-profit organization called Children of Conservation. This organization works closely with PASA sanctuaries and provides various benefits to the sanctuaries including a scholarship program that gives educational funding for the children of the sanctuary workers.

MICHELE STUMPE – Member, Board of Directors

michele_stumpe_thumbMichele Stumpe, a Director on the PASA Board, is an attorney and partner in the Atlanta law firm of Taylor English Duma LLP. She began working with gorillas, chimpanzees and orangutans in the 1980’s as a zoo volunteer in the nursery at the Gladys Porter Zoo. Early in her legal career, Stumpe set out to combine her professional talents with her passion for conservation and great apes. Since 1999, she has volunteered at various sanctuaries in Africa and the US. She has also served on advisory boards to the Dewar Wildlife Trust, the only gorilla sanctuary in the USA, and the Great Ape Project, International. In 2005, Stumpe became a member of the Dewar Wildlife Trust Board of Directors.

As an entrepreneur who has created and run several successful companies, Stumpe is highly regarded in the legal and professional community for her integrity, insight and business sense. It was these qualities that led to her appointment in 2005 as the acting President of Great Ape Project, International – the umbrella organization for the Great Ape Project organizations throughout the world. In 2009, Stumpe and her husband started their own non-profit organization called Children of Conservation. This organization works closely with PASA sanctuaries and provides various benefits to the sanctuaries including a scholarship program that gives educational funding for the children of the sanctuary workers.

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RICHARD WRANGHAM – Member, Board of Directors

Richard Wrangham, a Director on the PASA Board, is the Ruth Moore Professor of Anthropology at Harvard University. Since 1987, Richard has also been the Director of Laboratory of Nutritional Ecology at Harvard University. He received his Ph.D. in Zoology from Cambridge University in 1975 on the behavioral ecology of chimpanzees in Gombe National Park, Tanzania. Since 1987, Richard has been the Director of the Kibale Chimpanzee Project in western Uganda. This project includes research on behavior, ecology, and physiology of chimpanzees and monkeys, and conservation.

Richard serves on the editorial boards of several scientific journals including Folia Primatologica, Primates, International Journal of Primatology and Evolutionary Psychology. He is the chairman of the Great Ape Wild Heritage Species project and also serves on the boards of several organizations including the International Union for the Conservation of Nature Species Survival Commission Primate Specialist Group, the Jane Goodall Institute, the Gorilla Foundation, WildAid, and the Wild Chimpanzee Foundation, among others. Richard was the President of the International Primatological Society from 2004 to 2008.

He is the author of two books, Catching Fire: How Cooking Made Us Human, and Demonic Males: Apes and the Origins of Human Violence, (co-authored by D. Peterson), as well as numerous scientific articles and book chapters. Dr. Wrangham has won numerous awards and fellowships including the Royal Anthropological Institute Rivers Medal and is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

RICHARD WRANGHAM – Member, Board of Directors

richard_wrangham_thumbRichard Wrangham, a Director on the PASA Board, is the Ruth Moore Professor of Anthropology at Harvard University. Since 1987, Richard has also been the Director of Laboratory of Nutritional Ecology at Harvard University. He received his Ph.D. in Zoology from Cambridge University in 1975 on the behavioral ecology of chimpanzees in Gombe National Park, Tanzania. Since 1987, Richard has been the Director of the Kibale Chimpanzee Project in western Uganda. This project includes research on behavior, ecology, and physiology of chimpanzees and monkeys, and conservation.

Richard serves on the editorial boards of several scientific journals including Folia Primatologica, Primates, International Journal of Primatology and Evolutionary Psychology. He is the chairman of the Great Ape Wild Heritage Species project and also serves on the boards of several organizations including the International Union for the Conservation of Nature Species Survival Commission Primate Specialist Group, the Jane Goodall Institute, the Gorilla Foundation, WildAid, and the Wild Chimpanzee Foundation, among others. Richard was the President of the International Primatological Society from 2004 to 2008.

He is the author of two books, Catching Fire: How Cooking Made Us Human, and Demonic Males: Apes and the Origins of Human Violence, (co-authored by D. Peterson), as well as numerous scientific articles and book chapters. Dr. Wrangham has won numerous awards and fellowships including the Royal Anthropological Institute Rivers Medal and is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences